Jay Quigley’s TED Talk on Overcoming Speciesism

Jay Quigley’s TED Talk provides a great primer on speciesism, a pervasive form of discrimination against animals that permeates all animal eating cultures, and shows how it fuels the socially accepted commodification and killing of billions of famed animals. He also provides hope and practical advice on how to end their suffering and bring our food choices more in alignment with our values. Continue reading

Ginger and Fred: Two Lucky Ducks!

In the first week of May, Red Door Animal Shelter notified us that they had rescued two Pekin ducks, a bonded couple, who were now in need of a permanent home. Red Door found the pair as tiny little ducklings, wandering the city streets shortly after Easter. They spent about three weeks at the shelter and were examined by the avian vets at Midwest Exotics. Continue reading

A Mother At Last

In a natural environment, chicks would spend much of their first weeks of life peeping out from under their mother’s wings, or exploring by her side, feeling nurtured and protected. But chicks raised for eggs and meat rarely know their mother’s warmth, or experience the sense of security and belonging they instinctively seek. Instead, they are hatched by the hundreds of thousands in massive industrial incubator drawers stacked ceiling to floor. Shortly thereafter, they are slaughtered. Rhonda and Popeye were luckier. Continue reading

The Chicken Chronicles Part II: From Battery Cage to Sanctuary

The poultry industry represents chickens bred for food as mentally vacuous, eviscerated organisms. Hens bred for commercial egg production are said to be suited to a caged environment, with no need for personal space or normal foraging and social activity. They are characterized as aggressive cannibals who, notwithstanding their otherwise mindless passivity and affinity for cages, cannot live together in a cage without first having a portion of their sensitive beaks burned off – otherwise, it is said, they will tear each other up. Continue reading

Breaking the Food Chain Myth

Claiming to be at the top of the food chain is a popular justification for eating animal products and an affirmation of our ability to violently dominate everyone. Yet justifications for violence that draw on notions of power and supremacy are based on the philosophy that “Might makes right” — the principle behind the worst atrocities and crimes of human history. Continue reading

Milk of the Poisonous Tree: Reconnecting with Our Food Choices

There are many familiar claims through which we seek to deny personal responsibility for our food choices despite the fact that eating animal products means we pay someone else to dominate, exploit and violently kill healthy, infant or adolescent animals who want to live. Following are a few common examples: “You can still eat animals and love them;” Continue reading

One Survivor’s Story of Whole Foods Humane Hoax

They named her Mei Hua (Beautiful Flower), the sweet little hen DxE rescued from near death inside of a living hell, a Whole Foods egg supplier. Check out this moving video about the investigation and rescue of Mei Hua and the photos we obtained showing her transformation and rehabilitation. She is now living peacefully on a sanctuary in California. Continue reading

Hunting for Wildlife Population Control and Ethical Eating?

Hunters sometimes argue that if they were to stop hunting, the deer population would explode. This is a false argument, because if hunting were to stop, we would also stop the practices that increase the deer population. State wildlife management agencies artificially boost the deer population in order to increase recreational hunting opportunities for hunters. Continue reading

Animals Can’t Reason, Don’t Deserve Same Consideration

Regarding the question of how we ought to treat nonhuman animals, philosopher Jeremy Bentham famously wrote, The question is not, “Can they reason?” nor “Can they talk?” but, “Can they suffer?” Indeed, the capacity for a being to experience pain and suffering is the only morally relevant criterion needed to determine that we should refrain from inflicting pain and suffering. Continue reading